Personal musings, wanderings and sightings from around the lake.
A little history, and about the lake, at the bottom of the page.

quote

Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me



Friday, 26 February 2016

Oystercatcher



The first post on here for some time, and it will probably be the last for a little while, so an update type thing in a way.



Myself and Whisky have been visiting here daily for a couple of weeks now. He loves playing with all the dogs he meets on our visits and chasing after sticks.





The long staying Ferruginous Duck seems to have moved on now. A few days ago it had moved on to Mount Farm Lake nearby; about 2 minutes away as the duck flies.
Could still be there. I don't go chasing after birds however near they are. I leave that sort of thing to the Twatchers of the world, and county.



The Red Crested Pochard is still here though, mingling with some Mallards.
It will also feed on bread, so I'm guessing it's a pretty tame bird.



A 'wild' bird, that is quite tame, is this Robin.




 He will, on occasion, take seed from your hand; when he feels like it.



Here's a pair from yesterday.




I'm guessing a pair, because they are not trying to kill each other.





Lots of plants and shrubs are in flower at the moment. Lots of Dasies, Dandelions, Primroses, and this Lesser Celandine.







There has been some lovely sunny mornings recently.





Not sure how long that Dogwood is going to last, the chainsaw brigade are out in earnest all around MK at the moment.






Make quite a mess in the process too.






It's been good to see some blue sky, with lots of birds singing in the mornings.




Reed Bunting








Blue Tit









Lesser Redpoll





Now, to the title, Oystercatcher.

Yesterday morning, 25th, I saw one fly in over the road bridge, and head towards the island.
The last half dozen years they have nested here, and on checking my records, (I sound a bit anal there, like some sort of birder), I noticed that it was 3 days earlier than my previous 'early' sighting of 28th, back in 2012.
Today I saw it again, on one of the jetties on the north lake, amongst some Black-headed Gulls.
Hopefully they will be breeding again this year. Egg laying is usually from mid April onwards, so fingers crossed.



I've seen Mallards mating today, and yesterday, a weed dance by some Great Crested Grebes.








My first of this year.






Full list of today's sightings


Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greylag Goose [sp] (Anser anser)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Red-crested Pochard (Netta rufina)
Common Pochard (Aythya ferina)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Little Egret [sp] (Egretta garzetta)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Eurasian Oystercatcher [sp] (Haematopus ostralegus)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Common Gull (Larus canus canus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
British Herring Gull (Larus argentatus argenteus)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Eurasian Collared Dove [sp] (Streptopelia decaocto)
Common Kingfisher [sp] (Alcedo atthis)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos clarkei)
British Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus rosaceus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)

Total species  33




12 comments:

  1. It looks as if spring is just around the corner. Stay safe.

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  2. Like that first image...not everyone owns a levitating stick fetcha!...lol.
    Lovely images and video, looks like the bird life around the lake is getting geared up for a good year, despite the vandals best efforts to deter it.
    Lets hope the Oystercatchers have a good one too?...[;o)

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  3. Thanks Adrian. We've had some good weather here recently. Nature seems to be moving things on quickly.

    Cheers Trev. Apart from the chainsaw brigades best efforts, the lake is certainly looking good at the moment.

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  4. The lake shot with the swan in it is lovely. Have a good break.

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  5. Lovely shots. Those red trees are very striking, and your bird shots have such details!

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  6. Thank you Wilma. I'm looking forward to getting away for a while.

    Simon, thank you. I doubt the red Dogwood will survive for much longer the way the 'ground management crew' are working at the moment. Such a shame. Even the berry bushes, which are a winter food source for many birds have been cut down.

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  7. Dogwwod always looks at its best in the low Winter Sun. It really looks spectacular with the reflection in the lake.

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  8. Thanks John. It's a lovely shrub, but sadly a lot has been cut down here recently in the name of 'management'.

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  9. SOOOO hoping on a nesting of the Oystercatchers...I never tire of that grebe dance, the Clark & Western Grebe in our western states do a similar dance, I got to see a sort of acting out form of it last fall, Enjoyed all these lovely photos in this post, the early spring color is much earlier than we are here.

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  10. Thanks Sondra. Our weather here has been very mild and things seem to be happening earlier than usual.
    The Grebes certainly know how to perform. I'm pretty sure the Oystercatchers will breed again this year, one spent a lot of time on the island. Choosing a suitable nest area I think.

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  11. The Reed Bunting is something else, a beautiful photo. And the Grebes are showing their love.

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