Personal musings, wanderings and sightings from around the lake.

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A little history, and about the lake, at the bottom of the page.

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Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me



Sunday, 3 March 2013

A cold morning




A cold frosty start to the day.


A large area of the north and south lake was frozen; must have been cold last night.
No sign of Doris under the road bridge, but her friends were out in force.

Fed them, and worked my way round the frozen north lake.
A pair of Goosanders flew over, and settled in the distance, and a pair of Shoveler flew in, and joined a small group of Tufted Duck.

A small group of Siskin were chattering noisily in one of the trees. Certainly lots of these birds around at the moment.

The top end was almost completely frozen, except for a small area that was full of Wigeon.

Round past the pub, and onto the south lake.

I was thinking the boats wouldn't be out today, but I was wrong. One was doing its best to break through the ice; and a few more were getting ready to set out.

A quick walk round here yesterday, and the Scaup were about until the boats started to put everything in the air. Today, no sign of them, so I guess they've finally moved on. Maybe to Willen, with the four that went earlier in the week.


More Tufted Duck at the far end, a quick visit to see Robin, and then round past the houses.

Finally, a look over at Cormorant island. A female Goosander on the island, a couple of Tufted Duck and a Pochard.



This time last year, on the island, a pair of Oystercatchers were making plans for a family. Sadly, after the last 3 or 4 years, there's no sign of them this year. My guess is the recent flooding we've had here, and it's put them off.











Full list of today's sightings


Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greylag Goose [sp] (Anser anser)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Gadwall [sp] (Anas strepera)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata)
Common Pochard (Aythya ferina)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Goosander (Mergus merganser merganser)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Common Gull (Larus canus canus)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
British Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major anglicus)
British Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes indigenus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
Fieldfare (Turdus pilaris)
British Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos clarkei)
Redwing [sp] (Turdus iliacus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
Eurasian Siskin (Carduelis spinus)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  35



13 comments:

  1. Its a shame about the Oystercatchers Keith, maybe they thought "well all we get is water we may as well head for the shoreline somewhere."

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  2. Thanks Roy. Yea, it's a shame they haven't come this year. It won't be the same seeing them daily.

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  3. Do you think there could still be time for the Oystercatchers Keith? My, it did look cold there, the boaters must have been mad! I loved the noisy, excited greeting the Mallards gave you :-)

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  4. Last year, on the last day of February, I managed to see the Oystercatchers mating on the island Jan. It's quite possible they still might turn up. I just hope they don't flood the lake again. Last May a lot of nesting birds were washed out, including the Kingfishers.
    Those Mallards are quite comical.

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  5. Even colder there than it was here - still a lot colder than the sunny day we had Saturday. I think many plants and animals must be thoroughly confused the way temps keep going up and down.

    I see your Pied Piper of the Mallards act is still working a treat ;)

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  6. A wonderful post Keith..

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  7. HI Keith...Better late then never so here I am : )
    I laughed to see that boat out there..how crazy is that!!
    It must be pretty cold to freeze that lake, but there seem to be plenty of open for the ducks !!
    It's it nice when there is something so happy to see you as those Mallard are "Moochers" ; )
    To bad about the Oystercathers, but there may be hope yet, you never know!!

    Hugs
    Grace

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  8. It is blasted cold Keith.
    Dozens of Oystercatcher here but little sign of them pairing up so there is time for yours yet.
    The only birds showing signs of spring are Robin and Blue Tit being Bolshie and Rooks nest building. If chucking a pile of sticks into a tree can be called nest building.

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  9. Apologies for late response.

    John, I think you're right. Nature seems to have crazy just recently; one day cold, next day sunny.

    Thanks Andrew.

    Thank you Grace. Those Mallards are great the way they come flying over lol

    Cheers Adrian. I was watching a pair of Magpies nest building this morning. More cold weather to come though, apparently.

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  10. Hi Keith, enjoyed your video and commentary. It seems the thrill of the chase helps ease out the cold some? What would the guys in the ice-breaker be doing then, would they be intending to fish or ...? You shared some lovely water-birds.

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  11. Thanks Carole. The people in the boats just like to annoy me at weekends. :-)

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  12. Wonderful. Love those ducks.

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