Personal musings, wanderings and sightings from around the lake.
A little history, and about the lake, at the bottom of the page.

quote

Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me



Friday, 18 January 2013

Goosander, Snipe, Goldeneye and more




Cold, frosty, and a few tiny snow flakes first thing this morning.


The forecast is for a lot of snow, so I didn't want to dawdle today. Made sure the feeders were all full, and then set off round the north lake.


The Mallards soon caught me under the road bridge, so after feeding them, I hurried on.

The Heron was in his usual spot under the footbridge, and didn't move as someone walked over. Different story as I got nearer. Maybe he doesn't like me.

The Goldeneye is still around, and parts of the lake are still frozen.
Up at the top end, nothing much about, apart from another Heron, tucked into the reeds.


Walking down towards the pub, something caught my eye as it flew to the edge of the lake, behind some bushes. I thought at first it was a Kingfisher, but as I got closer, it noisily took off. A very quick glimpse, but enough to confirm it was a Snipe.


On towards the south lake.


As I made my way under the road bridge, a flock of 20 or 30 smallish birds strung out in a line flew over. Probably Dunlin size, small bills, pointed wings, and what looked like a breast bib. No idea what they could have been, but with this bad weather, anything could be turning up.

Fed the Crows, and by now the snow was coming down a bit thicker. And beginning to settle on the path. I carried on. Three Goosander were swimming at the side of the lake, but quickly took off towards the middle as I walked nearer.

At the far end I quickly scanned through the group of gulls, but they were mostly Black-headed, and a couple of Common Gulls amongst them. The snow was getting heavier now as well.


Round by the offices, a group of Redwing and Blackbirds were flicking through the fallen leaves, searching for goodies. A large group of Siskin swirled overhead, and settled in the Alders behind me.


I carried on to the hide, and the Robin.


Success again, as he quickly snatched a seed from my outstretched hand.
Just the one, but he's getting more and more confident each day. I left him a handful of seed and carried on towards the rowing club.

A lone Lapwing flew overhead, and a couple of Rooks.
The path was getting quite treacherous now, as the snow had covered the ice and walking on it a bit tricky. I didn't want to slip and end up in the lake.


A male Goosander was preening just beyond one of the jetties, and as I got further round, a group of six were out on the water.






Eventually I was back at the car park, and the snow getting a bit thicker.






Time to head home.











Full list of today's sightings


Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greylag Goose [sp] (Anser anser)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Gadwall [sp] (Anas strepera)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Common Pochard (Aythya ferina)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Common Goldeneye [sp] (Bucephala clangula)
Goosander (Mergus merganser merganser)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Northern Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus)
Common Snipe [sp] (Gallinago gallinago)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Common Gull (Larus canus canus)
British Herring Gull (Larus argentatus argenteus)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Eurasian Collared Dove [sp] (Streptopelia decaocto)
British Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major anglicus)
Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba yarrellii)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos clarkei)
Redwing [sp] (Turdus iliacus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Rook [sp] (Corvus frugilegus)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)
Eurasian Siskin (Carduelis spinus)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  38


8 comments:

  1. I'll bet that you had all the Goosanders in England, lol.

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  2. Very glad you got back to the car safely Keith, it was beginning to look a bit dangerous! Our snow started late afternoon yesterday which was much earlier than forecast....and it hasn't stopped since! Quite disruptive now.

    I did well for Herons today :-) I'm sure they do like you really ;-) You're doing well with Robin. Stay warm and safe Keith!

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  3. Thanks Bob. There's always a lot here in the winter months. Great to see them.

    Thanks Jan. The snow is still falling now. Got back safely. I hope the birds can keep safe tonight.

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  4. Nothing quite as exciting as a bit of snow. The Robin is a grand chap or lass. I can't tell the difference.

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  5. Snow certainly transforms a landscape Adrian. Robins can't tell the difference either.
    The female has to beg for food to stop being attacked.
    Full of useless information I am :-)

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  6. You did well to beat the snow (almost!) this morning Keith!

    That Heron just doesn't like you, maybe you should add some small fish to the food bag!..lol.

    And a Snipe? almost, but not quite a Bittern!

    Q...If Robins don't know the different sex of one Robin from the next Robin perhaps your Robin shouldn't be called Robin but Robyn?...[;o)

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  7. The weather man forecasted snow and it actually happened. Now that has got to be some sort of a record Keith.
    That Heron just doesn't like you.{:))

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  8. I think fish could be next item in the pocket Trevor. Good to see a fleeting glimpse of the Snipe. :-)

    Roy, they finally got it right.
    Yea, that Heron must be camera shy I think.

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