Personal musings, wanderings and sightings from around the lake.
A little history, and about the lake, at the bottom of the page.

quote

Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me



Monday, 14 January 2013

Goosander, Siskin, Shoveler, and some snow




A light dusting of snow last night, made everywhere look very picturesque.




As I write this though, the snow is coming down much thicker and harder.



After topping up the feeders, and feeding the Crows and Magpies, I set off round the north lake. Sometimes a bit of bad weather can bring a few surprises.

No surprise as the Mallards caught me under the road bridge though.
After feeding them, I made my way up to the next footbridge. Standing underneath it was the Heron, picking up the stray fish that the Cormorants were pushing his way. Clever bird.
A group of Tufted Duck further out on the lake, but no sign today of yesterdays Goldeneye.

Up towards the top end, and I could hear the sound of the Wigeon whistling. A few Tufted Duck, Gadwall and Pochard with them; and 3 Goosander suddenly took to the air as a jogger jogged by.
A Wren was 'ticking' loudly by the gully, and over in the bushes sat a Kingfisher. Not long enough for a picture though.

Past the pub, and the Mallards flew over for more food.
And Doris, the female, is getting rather bold, almost landing on my shoulder. Not content to eat with the rest, she kept following me along the path, all the way to the road bridge.
Goodness knows what the people in the pub must think.

At the south lake, the Crows were waiting, and by the time I'd reached the far end, they'd stopped following me.

A quick look at the Crows in the field, and then on towards the hide, and the Robin.

A large flock of Siskin flew round overhead, but carried on.
I found another, smaller group, up by the offices.


Under the bushes, a group of Redwing and a couple of Blackbirds were furiously turning the fallen leaves over, searching for food.


The Robin met me half way.




This time he didn't follow me, so I quickly made my way towards the rowing club.




A group of mixed gulls out on the water, and a few Pochard. Also, another male Goosander, swimming towards the island.

Past the houses, and a large flock of Lapwings flew overhead, and as I got level with Cormorant island, five Shoveler took to the air, and began flying around overhead.

A quick check on the feeders; nothing, and then down to the footbridge.


A Song Thrush was checking the exposed grass for any tasty treats,




and over on the bridge, a few Tits, a Robin, and a couple of Reed Buntings.





A very enjoyable walk with some great birds for company. I might not get there tomorrow though.











Full list of today's sightings


Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greylag Goose [sp] (Anser anser)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Gadwall [sp] (Anas strepera)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata)
Common Pochard (Aythya ferina)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Goosander (Mergus merganser merganser)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Northern Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Common Gull (Larus canus canus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
British Herring Gull (Larus argentatus argenteus)
Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Common Kingfisher [sp] (Alcedo atthis)
Grey Wagtail [sp] (Motacilla cinerea)
Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba yarrellii)
British Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes indigenus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos clarkei)
Redwing [sp] (Turdus iliacus)
British Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus rosaceus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
British Jay (Garrulus glandarius rufitergum)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Eurasian Jackdaw [sp] (Corvus monedula)
Rook [sp] (Corvus frugilegus)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
Eurasian Siskin (Carduelis spinus)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  43


13 comments:

  1. It's great how a bit of snow changes the familiar into the magical.

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  2. A good count this morning Keith, and you managed to beat the snow, the sugar frosting just got thicker!!

    Doris will soon be walking the whole way round with you, I hope Robin's not the jealous type?...[;o)

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  3. Yea, it certainly looked good this morning Adrian.

    Some great birds Trevor. Still waiting on Waxwing, Smew and Bittern though. Doris is getting very clingy lol

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  4. Ever the Optimist the Heron Keith.{:))

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  5. Love the Robin and all the rest. Smashing video Keith.

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  6. They certainly are Roy. This one has it down to a fine art.

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  7. Thanks Bob. Glad you enjoyed the video.

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  8. I do admire the patience of Herons....I wouldn't fancy standing in that cold water at all. One of these days Doris and Robin and probably the Crow will be waiting in line for you in the car park ;-)

    We had a bit more snow than that but not as much as some.

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  9. Jan, the Heron has got more patience than I could ever hope to have lol
    Yea, these birds are getting cheeky beyond belief. I'm sure if I put my arm out, Doris would fly in like a hawk.

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  10. YOU have quite the "following" at the lake Keith! THEY love you so much! The little robin shot is awesome...the snow does look nice!

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  11. Thanks Sondra. Yea, it does feel amazing when these little birds recognise you out of all the other people around.

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  12. We started with a similar light covering and ended up with about four inches of snow by bedtime.
    No fools, those corvids Keith. Nothing like a free meal to concentrate the mind.

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  13. Had a lot fall yesterday afternoon too John.
    Nearly all gone now. Crazy.

    Those Crows really are smart. Other people walk down the path, and they ignore them. I get an apple out my pocket, and there they are. lol

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