Personal musings, wanderings and sightings from around the lake.
A little history, and about the lake, at the bottom of the page.

quote

Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me



Saturday, 3 November 2012

Egyptian Geese



YouTube is down at the moment  Http/1.1 Service Unavailable so no video today.


Bright, sunny, but very cold, with a light frost on the grass this morning.

Quite a big gull roost now on the south lake, and a few Cormorants over on the island.
After topping up the feeders I made my way round the north lake.
The footbridge had over a dozen Collared Doves there this morning. They've had a good breeding year.

A few Redwing in the trees, and as I got to the road bridge, a gang of Mallards appeared, along with the regular pair.

No sign of a Kingfisher this morning, but I was surprised to see not one, but seven Egyptian Geese swimming on the lake.




There's a few that have bred at Woburn, and I'm wondering if this group are from there.


Up at the top end there were nine Wigeon, and three Gadwall; along with a group of Cormorants on the old boat.
A few newer boats were out on the water by now too.


In front of the pub, a Green Woodpecker was searching for food,




 and the gang of Mallards appeared again, searching for me; and food.




It was getting a bit windy and cloudy as I started to walk round the south lake.
The Crows began following me as I walked the path, but no apple today. They had a bread roll instead.



Down at the bottom end, a couple of Mute Swans were feeding, a Heron hiding in the reeds, and a group of Long Tailed Tits noisily flitting through the trees.





I'd been checking the Ash trees as I walked round, looking for signs of this terrible disease that's hit them over here. To be honest though, I'm not sure what I should be looking for.




Not sure if this is normal die back of the leaves or not.



Soon past the rowing club, and by now the wind had begun to get stronger; and colder.
The swan family from Cormorant island were feeding round by the town houses, and the cygnets are as big as the adults now.


An enjoyable morning.



Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Egyptian Goose (Alopochen aegyptiaca)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Gadwall [sp] (Anas strepera)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Common Gull (Larus canus canus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Eurasian Collared Dove [sp] (Streptopelia decaocto)
Green Woodpecker [sp] (Picus viridis)
Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba yarrellii)
British Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes indigenus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
Redwing [sp] (Turdus iliacus)
British Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus rosaceus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Eurasian Jackdaw [sp] (Corvus monedula)
Rook [sp] (Corvus frugilegus)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  36

18 comments:

  1. Great to get a shot of the green woodpecker....A record shot..makes mine look okay.
    Ash die back....well who knows? Oak infestation is worse but no one seems to worry....They will when there is no oxygen in the air for us to breath. We'll be dead then so no worries.

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  2. Maybe the Mayans were right Adrian, the way things are going.

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  3. Hi Keith...Those Egyptian geese are a lovely color!!
    The Long Tailed Tit is always a show stealer with me!! : )
    I have Kingfishers on my post,what's wrong with you!! lol
    Hugs
    Grace

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  4. The only contact I've had with Mayans are the wee tubby Mexicans.
    Missing a trick here.
    I was hauling the little buggers out of the backwash of Katrina.
    Katrina was big....10% bigger than the wee windy job that hit Atlantic City and New York.
    What do Mayan's know?

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  5. A cold morning Keith but the birds still put on a good show for you!...[;o)

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  6. Thanks Grace. I'll take a look at your Kingfisher.
    I'm all behind with blogs. Spent too much time going out. :-)

    I'm hoping the Mayans don't know too much Adrian. I'm rather liking it here at the moment.

    Yea, another great visit Trevor.

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  7. Always plenty of interest at the lake Keith. Lovely photo of the little Long-tailed Tit. The Ash Tree disease is appalling, I read that experts have told the government that most trees will be affected within ten years :-( Apparently they pleaded with them to take action at the beginning of the year but were ignored.

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  8. Here is a link about that Ash Dieback Keith.

    http://www.forestry.gov.uk/website/forestry.nsf/byunique/infd-8zlksx

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  9. The planetary alignment may very well be responsible for the changes of the airstream which seems to have shifted things a bit..
    LOVE those Egyptians!! And the little tit one of my favs.

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  10. Jan, this Ash disease has been mishandled by both parties. Labour knew about when they were in, but chose to ignore it.
    All our politicians are only interested in lining their own pockets.

    Thanks for the link Roy.

    Sondra, there certainly seems to be a lot of extreme weather around the world.

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  11. I have never captured a picture of a Green Woodpecker Keith... it's one of my bogey birds.

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  12. Cheers Andrew. They can be a bit tricky. Very wary.

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  13. Lovely photo of the LTT. Finding one still enough to photo can be a problem.
    I think it's difficult to tell with Ash at this time of year Keith.

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  14. Thanks John. I think you're right about the Ash. I find it quite difficult to tell if it's diseased.

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  15. That long-tailed titmouse doesn't look like he appreciates publicity.

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  16. Thanks Jerry. It was unusual to manage to get one to sit still long enough for a picture. lol

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