Personal musings, wanderings and sightings from around the lake.
A little history, and about the lake, at the bottom of the page.

quote

Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me



Saturday, 24 November 2012

A bit wetter




Cold, frosty and a bit misty to start the day. Now it's raining.


The Crows and Magpies had some food this morning, but I couldn't get to the feeders. I'd have been up to my waist in water. The level has risen a lot since yesterday.




The Mute Swans from Cormorant island were swimming under the feeders, so they got some food instead.




I had a quick look over at Cormorant island first. The pathway around the edge of the lake was under water, and so was the island. A good job ground nesting birds have finished for now. Would have been disastrous for them.
A couple of Song Thrushes were foraging under the bushes. Good to see these. They seem to be doing well here.


I walked back towards the north lake, but didn't think I'd get very far. I was right; the path under the road bridge was flooded, and probably beyond too.

Back to the car park, and I decided to drive across the road to the pub, and park there. Maybe I could get further round from that side.

From the front of the pub the path was clear, so I made my way round towards the gully. That was as far as I could get. The raging waters of yesterday had calmed down, but the level of water made it impossible to get through.




It was like one big lake.


I did manage to see a Kingfisher fly past. He was probably wondering why the lake had increased in size.

Even crossing the footbridge over the river couldn't get me any further.




Back to the car, and try the south lake instead.



By avoiding the footpath round the edge of the lake, and keeping on the higher ground nearer the houses, I did manage to get to the far end. A few boats out on the lake by now; a bit tricky I would have thought, not seeing where the edge of the lake is.

The birds were still around thankfully. A few Redwings at the far end, a pair of Bullfinches near the bird hide, never seen any this end before, a lone Little Egret flying overhead, and quite a large, mobile flock of Siskins, raiding the Beech trees.
Another Song Thrush was sitting in the trees too.

After paddling around by the bird hide for a while, I decided to walk back the way I had come.


Enjoyable, despite the flooding.










Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greylag Goose [sp] (Anser anser)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Gadwall [sp] (Anas strepera)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Common Pochard (Aythya ferina)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Little Egret [sp] (Egretta garzetta)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Eurasian Collared Dove [sp] (Streptopelia decaocto)
Common Kingfisher [sp] (Alcedo atthis)
British Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major anglicus)
Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba yarrellii)
British Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes indigenus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos clarkei)
Redwing [sp] (Turdus iliacus)
British Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus rosaceus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Eurasian Jackdaw [sp] (Corvus monedula)
Rook [sp] (Corvus frugilegus)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)
Eurasian Siskin (Carduelis spinus)
British Bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula pileata)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  41


9 comments:

  1. A brilliant video today.
    Could have done with a bit of wading and you falling in but we'll leave perfection for another day.
    Have you got a new car?
    The pole walkers are Nordic Walkers...They only go on the flat. They look like lobsters when they attempt a hill and are slower than I am. The dogs love them....keep expecting and encouraging them to throw their sticks.
    Daft dogs don't understand Special Needs people.

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  2. You got to see alot even though it was so wet. You might need to carry a snorkle instead of your camera for a bit. From Findlay

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  3. Cheers Adrian. These stick people are becoming quite popular here. Not with me though, they make such a racket as they clack along the footpaths, it scares the birds away.
    Yea, new car; Astra estate.

    Thank you Findlay. I could attempt the wading then that Adrian wants lol

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  4. I tend to be a person who doesn't like to be waddling in the water. I stay at home, and play with my computer. You have an energy for looking at things that need doing, like the birds, how would they do without you, tell me?

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  5. LOTS of water so weird to see the swans under the bird feeders! Stick people..haha thats a funny---
    Is this the highest level the lake has been?

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  6. Thanks Bob. Yea, I love to get out when I can. Late getting up this morning though. :-(

    Thanks Sondra. It's the highest I've seen it, but back in May when I was in Wales, it was about another 18 inches higher.

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  7. Lovely encounter with the swan family. Great weather for water fowl.
    Still waiting for the rain to ease off here to get in our first walk of the day.

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  8. Oh my! I bet it's even worse today if you had the same amount of rain we did last night. Seeing the almost completely submerged seat really showed how bad it is. The swans were enjoying it all though :-)

    I really don't get the stick people! I could understand it if they were unsteady on their feet but what sort of benefit there is for people who looked as fit as those is a mystery to me.

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  9. Thanks John. The water birds are certainly enjoying all this water. It's increased the size of the lake quite a bit.

    Jan, the stick walking is another money making gimmick by some clever soul. I wish I'd thought of it.
    My granddad walked with a stick, but not as fast as these people.

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