Personal musings, wanderings and sightings from around the lake.
A little history, and about the lake, at the bottom of the page.

quote

Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me



Monday, 17 October 2011

Redwings


Another dry morning, without the mist this time, and the light was like gold.





A circuit of just the north lake today.

Up by the pub, the Lesser Black-backed Gull was wandering around on the grass, and a few Starlings were gathering up on the sails of the windmill. Their numbers are certainly increasing now, as are the Coots. Quite a few Wigeon today, too.

A couple of Jays flew across the lake, up by the weir, and a couple of Magpies escorted a Sparrowhawk along his way.
Along the path, a pair of Swans seemed to be coaxing one of their cygnets towards the river. There were already 4 swimming around in there, and I wondered if these were the Swans that originally had 8 youngsters. They lost one quite early, and recently I've only noticed 6. Have they lost another?
The male Swan had a metal ring on his right leg, with a number; '8223' or 'B223'.
I'll see if I can find out any info on him.

As I got up to the footbridge, by the bandstand, a group of Long Tailed Tits flew into some berry laden bushes.




A few lovely moments watching this noisy little party; and something I've not seen before.........they were eating the berries.





According to my bird books, they eat insects. Maybe they don't read the books. 


Back at the car park, a few minutes watching the birds on the feeders, and then I saw some Redwings up in the bushes. Only managed a couple of shots for now, but this one's for Bob, because I know he likes them.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~







Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Gadwall [sp] (Anas strepera)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Eurasian Sparrowhawk [sp] (Accipiter nisus)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
Feral Pigeon (Columba livia 'feral')
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Green Woodpecker [sp] (Picus viridis)
Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba yarrellii)
British Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes indigenus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
Redwing [sp] (Turdus iliacus)
British Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus rosaceus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
British Jay (Garrulus glandarius rufitergum)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Rook [sp] (Corvus frugilegus)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)

Total species  34

Sunday, 16 October 2011

Sunday 16th October 2011


(a lot of pictures today; sorry for the overload)

Another misty start to the day; but no frost.

I couldn't see any winter thrushes this morning, but the winter ducks are building up their numbers. Despite the best efforts of the boat people putting the birds in the air,







there are still good numbers of Coot, Tufted Duck, Wigeon and Wigeon.
And at the far end of the south lake, half a dozen Little Grebe swimming around.

But back to the north lake, first. A Kingfisher flashed by his usual spot, and a few Herons flying or fishing, when they weren't disturbed.
A Jay gave me the chance for a distant flight shot.


 I could get better with this.


On the south lake, a lovely Grey Wagtail flew in, and briefly posed for a few pictures in the sunlight.



Still no sign of the Common Gull on Cormorant island, but a few Cormorants on there, and using the boat peoples buoys to dry their wings.



And at the feeders, a Crow was overlooking everything,



and a rat was doing his best to look 'cute'.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greylag Goose [sp] (Anser anser)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Gadwall [sp] (Anas strepera)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus)
Little Grebe [sp] (Tachybaptus ruficollis)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
Feral Pigeon (Columba livia 'feral')
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Common Kingfisher [sp] (Alcedo atthis)
British Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes indigenus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus rosaceus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
British Jay (Garrulus glandarius rufitergum)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Eurasian Jackdaw [sp] (Corvus monedula)
Rook [sp] (Corvus frugilegus)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)

Total species  35


Saturday, 15 October 2011

Winter Thrushes have arrived

A cold misty morning, with a light frost.


A lovely sunrise this morning, through the mist.




The mist just hung over the lake for a few hours, but when it cleared, a beautiful morning in its wake; apart from the joggers and the boat people. Oh well, you can't have everything.

Overhead, two large flocks of Fieldfare, moving south, and round by the car park, my first Redwings of the coming winter. I guess winter is coming.
Hopefully pictures of these lovely thrushes in the next few days.

I just walked the north lake this morning, but plenty of ducks to pick out through the mist; Gadwall, Wigeon, Tufted, Mallard..........until the boats emerged from the mist, and sent most of them flying.

A few Herons fishing, along with Cormorants; and still lots of Mute Swans about.




Big numbers of Wood Pigeon flying overhead too, and a couple of Green Woodpeckers laughing, as they made for the trees.

Back at the footbridge, between the joggers, a couple of Reed Buntings, along with the Chaffinch.


I wonder how long to the first arrivals of Brambling?









Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Gadwall [sp] (Anas strepera)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Little Grebe [sp] (Tachybaptus ruficollis)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Green Woodpecker [sp] (Picus viridis)
British Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes indigenus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
Fieldfare (Turdus pilaris)
British Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos clarkei)
Redwing [sp] (Turdus iliacus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Eurasian Jackdaw [sp] (Corvus monedula)
Rook [sp] (Corvus frugilegus)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  33


Friday, 14 October 2011

A sunny morning


The day started well; but I skipped the sunrise.

I would have tried, but the size of the gull roost drew me away from the sun. The gulls are steadily building up their numbers now, almost approaching the peak of last year. Mostly Black-headed and Lesser Black-backed; but could be others mixed in with them.
Watching them all suddenly take to the sky is quite a sight.

That meant the south lake was walked first, after topping up the feeders.
Quite early, about 6:45, four of the Little Egrets were heading north, after roosting at the island, and a group of Canada Geese were stretched across the path, lazily munching on the grass.
At the far end of the south lake, a few Wigeon and Tufted Duck, along with all the Coots, and as I got near the town houses, a little Wren appeared on the handrails.




Back at the car park, a quick look at the new feeder site produced a squirrel doing his best to get the peanuts. And at the footbridge, a couple of Reed Buntings, along with the Chaffinch and Dunnock.

Onto the north lake.

A Kingfisher flashed across the water up by the bandstand, and at the far end, a Heron circled around the grass, before heading off over the water,




By the weir, a couple of Wigeon, amongst all the Coots, and four Gadwall, taking in the morning sun.




A Cormorant was drying his wings on the old boat,




and a couple more Heron were dotted around the edge of the lake.

I was soon making my way back to the footbridge, but stopped to look up into the trees by the edge of the road, just past the road bridge. Something had caught my eye, high up in the leaves. A squirrel?
No, a rat. Three in fact.
Nothing to do with me........a long way away from the feeders.

Another look at the new feeders, and a Blue Tit had managed to get onto the nuts.




And waiting his turn, a Great Tit.




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~






Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greylag Goose [sp] (Anser anser)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Gadwall [sp] (Anas strepera)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Little Grebe [sp] (Tachybaptus ruficollis)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Little Egret [sp] (Egretta garzetta)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
Feral Pigeon (Columba livia 'feral')
Stock Pigeon [sp] (Columba oenas)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Common Kingfisher [sp] (Alcedo atthis)
Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba yarrellii)
British Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes indigenus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus rosaceus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Eurasian Jackdaw [sp] (Corvus monedula)
Rook [sp] (Corvus frugilegus)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  36


Thursday, 13 October 2011

No coffee today

The kettle must have boiled earlier.


The birds appear to have found the new home for the feeders, and seem to be approving of it.

Just the north lake again today, and a brief glimpse of a Kingfisher, near the top end.



 One day, I'll capture a good shot.


I noticed four Gadwall at the top end, and a couple of Wigeon, until Captain Pugwash appeared in a canoe, or something, and scared them away. Hopefully they'll be back in greater numbers soon.
And a Tern briefly flying around.





After looking through a couple of books, I can only think it's a Common Tern, although I thought these had moved on a while ago.

Back at the footbridge, a couple of Reed Buntings with some Chaffinch, a Robin ticking everyone off, and a lone rat making his way along the footbridge.





Apologies for the very poor quality of pictures today. One of those days when things go wrong. 
I'm just glad it ain't Friday.








Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Gadwall [sp] (Anas strepera)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
Common Tern [sp] (Sterna hirundo)
Feral Pigeon (Columba livia 'feral')
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Common Kingfisher [sp] (Alcedo atthis)
British Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes indigenus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos clarkei)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  31


Wednesday, 12 October 2011

Feeders re-sited

A cloudy start, but the sun soon put in an appearnce.

I found one Little Egret, over on Cormorant island this morning; maybe the rest had left earlier, or were better hidden.

I re-sited some of the feeders this morning. Trevor's idea seemed pretty good yesterday, so I took a few of them down to some bushes well away from the path, and near an arm of water that comes off the lake. Not sure if it's the spot Trevor had in mind, but it seemed OK. A few birds soon found them.

I just walked the north lake this morning; still got loads to do at home, but I'm not really in the mood for it all.

A nice little sign in one of the gardens made me smile.



Probably not intended for me, or most of the other people that pass by; but I could of done with a coffee.

A single Swallow was flying overhead; first one way, then the other, before eventually heading in a southerly direction.

Quite a few Coots gradually increasing their numbers, along with some Tufted Duck and the Canada Geese.
And at the jetty, near the pub, a few Cormorants busily drying their wings.
I managed to capture one that flew in their way too.




And as I got back to the footbridge, it was good to see some Reed Buntings coming back, to take advantage of the seed.








Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greylag Goose [sp] (Anser anser)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Little Egret [sp] (Egretta garzetta)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Green Woodpecker [sp] (Picus viridis)
Barn Swallow [sp] (Hirundo rustica)
Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba yarrellii)
British Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes indigenus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos clarkei)
Common Chiffchaff [sp] (Phylloscopus collybita)
British Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus rosaceus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  33

Tuesday, 11 October 2011

The Bird Feeders of Caldecotte

Since last November, I have been feeding the birds on a daily basis here; rain or shine, and even walking here in the snow, when I couldn't drive my car because of the conditions. I buy the seed, the feeders, and maintain it all. I take them home to clean them on a regular basis, and replace the feeders as they get destroyed by the squirrels.





No one asked me to do it; it's something I chose to do.
It attracts lots of birds.
It has also attracted some attention.


I guess if you are an organisation, it must be difficult trying to keep an acceptable balance, when a popular parkland area is used by members of the public, and is also home to the wildlife that lives there.






The wildlife has more than likely been pushed from its previous homes, when that was destroyed to make way for the 'people homes'.
Wildlife that is fast losing it's place in a society that seems hell bent on the destruction and scaring of this planet.




So the balance is made for us, to live side by side.
A sterile countryside, with neatly trimmed bushes and shrubs, Swans gracefully cruising on the lake, and fluffy bunnies scampering beside a fine gravel path.

Caldecotte Lake is quite a popular 'parkland', run by the Parks Trusts, of Milton Keynes. They do a difficult job. Who are they?

'The Parks Trust is the independent charity that owns and cares for many of Milton Keynes parks and green spaces.  This adds up to 4,500 acres of river valleys, woodlands, lakesides, parks and landscaped areas alongside the main roads – about 20 percent of the new city area.'

A quote from their web site.


Back to the feeders.

After returning at the weekend, from a few days away in Wales, I found a notice on the tree, by the feeders, from the Parks Trust.
A phone call to Dawn, and a meeting was arranged to discuss them.

The feeders have attracted some unwanted vermin, not just the kind that do this,



but the furry kind, with four legs. 


Rats.







Rats that live in the park, and probably go unnoticed by most people that visit. Unnoticed like most of the wildlife that tries to live here.


Now Dawn was a very sensible young woman. I must make this clear; she had a difficult job here...............meet the loony who is putting up bird feeders in a public area, and which has caused concern, and complaints, from members of the public that use this park.

So, how do we solve the problem, and keep everyone happy; including the birds, that are about to face another winter, and a possible food shortage?

The rats have a few tunnels by the footbridge, and have lived there for some time.
We inspected the area of the feeders, and found a few rat holes nearby. The rats have a ready made food source, inadvertently supplied by me, unfortunately, so they've set up home closer. Sensible, when you think about it.

Dawn suggested that by removing the fat balls; and their biggest high energy food source, hopefully they would move on.
"What about the seed feeders?" I asked.
"They can stay for now. We'll monitor the situation."
"Shall I take the fat balls down now?"
"No, let the birds finish them, but don't replace them."

That seemed pretty fair to me. Everything stays the same......for now.

Well, not quite everything.
The picnic table.
I've been putting seed on the picnic table by the car park; the one the other visitors to the park burnt a hole in with a BBQ.
It really should be for people to sit down, enjoy a rest, and maybe have a sandwich.





Or carve bits out of it, to while away the time.


I agreed not to use it as a giant bird table.


So a productive meeting, and good to meet someone from the organisation that does its best to maintain the park for everyone.
I'd like to say a big thank you to Dawn, for being understanding, helpful, and not a monster.


One final thought though; I do hope the members of the public that were horrified to see a few rats living in the country, and not near their lovely homes, never have to witness a male swan, fighting another, over territory..........or watch a couple of Great Crested Grebes, trying to drown each other, for the same reason................or a Heron, taking a duckling for lunch............or, well, you get the idea.
Nature isn't always how some of us would like to believe it is.



It would be terrible to have to live in a Disney world, and not the real one.

Normal post tomorrow, hopefully. 

Enjoy the rest of your day, and the nature around you. The way the world is going, it might not be there to enjoy one day.


Monday, 10 October 2011

A bit windy

Just a bit.

Very few birds about this morning, and just a quick visit, because I wanted to get back to ring Dawn from the Parks Trust.

Just the north lake visited this morning, and lots of Coots about. More than anything else I would guess.

A fleeting glimpse of a Sparrowhawk, and that was probably the highlight of the morning.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


I rang Dawn, and the problem seems to be the rats.




Some complaints from members of the public about the rats; not the rubbish, the illegal fishing, the dog crap, the burnt tables from barbecues...............no, a few rats seems the cause for concern from a few members of the public.
So, I'm meeting Dawn this afternoon, at 2:30, by the feeders, to discus the rats.

We'll see what happens.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Eurasian Sparrowhawk [sp] (Accipiter nisus)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Feral Pigeon (Columba livia 'feral')
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Eurasian Jackdaw [sp] (Corvus monedula)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)

Total species  21



Sunday, 9 October 2011

Bureaucracy

Back after a week away, and I come home to a pile of letters, all awaiting urgent attention, and this, attached to the tree with the feeders.




Now it could mean one of two things; a bollocking for feeding the birds; or they're going to donate some bird seed to help out.
I'll ring them tomorrow, but I think I know how the conversation will go.

More importantly though, the birds.
The feeders were all empty, but a few birds were around by the bridge. A few more turned up once the feeders were full.

Around the north lake the bird population consisted mainly of Coots, but a flash of blue, as a Kingfisher made his way across the lake was a welcome sight, and a Heron,




just loafing around.

Around by the pub, a couple of Pied Wagtails, Black-headed Gulls, Cormorants, and quite a few Starlings. And briefly, on the grass,



 a Green Woodpecker.


Quite a dull, cloudy morning, but at least the rain had stopped, as I made my way round the south lake.

More Coots.
A few Mute Swans, Great Crested Grebes; and out in the middle of the lake, a dozen or more Lesser Black-backed Gulls, bobbing on the water.

The south end of the lake seemed very quiet, and as I made my way back towards the car park, a Robin was keeping a watchful eye.




An interesting morning.









Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Common Kingfisher [sp] (Alcedo atthis)
Green Woodpecker [sp] (Picus viridis)
Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba yarrellii)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Eurasian Jackdaw [sp] (Corvus monedula)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)

Total species  25