Personal musings, wanderings and sightings from around the lake.
A little history, and about the lake, at the bottom of the page.

quote

Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me



Wednesday, 7 December 2011

Great Northern Diver still here

But very windy, and cold.

I think we could be in for some bad weather soon.

At least the sun came out eventually, as I made my way round the south lake first, after a quick look under the road bridge. The Great northern Diver was easy to pick out in the early gloom, and a few Coots and Mallards were beginning to come to life.

As I passed the rowing club, a few Gadwall were socialising with some Mallards, but the  Herons were not so friendly towards each other; they were spending more time chasing each other round the lake.

A few Redwings in the trees by the bird hide, and a small group of Siskins.
The wader scrape had the usual Black-headed Gulls, and a few Mallard and Moorhen.

A quick look in the fields, at the very south end of the lake, for the sunrise,



 and then on my way up the west side of the lake.
The Crows were following me as I threw them some bits of apple, and eventually the core.


The sun was a lovely golden glow as I walked towards the road bridge, and the north lake.
A Heron sat by the edge, in the early morning sunlight,




 and close by a Kingfisher, in the tangle of bushes.




A large flock of Lapwing flew overhead, the sunlight catching their white bellies, against the blue sky.


The Great Northern Diver was swimming out in the middle of the lake now, basking in the sun.



 Very distant unfortunately, but still good to see him.


At the top end, by the weir, Wigeon, Gadwall and Coots, and a few Canada Geese grazing on the grass.

On the stretch of water, near the bandstand, a pair of Mallards were getting rather intimate. Much too cold for that sort of thing I reckon.

Eventually making my way back towards the car park, I stopped to watch a large juvenile gull of some sort.
Not my speciality for ID purposes.

He was flying up, and then dropping down into the water, like a Gannet; but without the speed, or closing the wings.




 He didn't seem to catch anything, but we both enjoyed what he was doing.


A last check on the busy feeders, and then home.










Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Gadwall [sp] (Anas strepera)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Great Northern Diver (Gavia immer)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Northern Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Common Gull (Larus canus canus)
Stock Pigeon [sp] (Columba oenas)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Common Kingfisher [sp] (Alcedo atthis)
Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba yarrellii)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
Redwing [sp] (Turdus iliacus)
British Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus rosaceus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Eurasian Jackdaw [sp] (Corvus monedula)
Rook [sp] (Corvus frugilegus)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
House Sparrow [sp] (Passer domesticus)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)
Eurasian Siskin (Carduelis spinus)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  36


9 comments:

  1. Great light in the first three stills. Pictures I would be proud of!
    A great video and the young Herring Gull was a Gannet in it's previous incarnation daft bird!

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  2. Keith, apart from the cold wind, it looks like you had a great walk around the lakes this morning.

    And as for that Kingfisher, it looks like a 'stunning picture' is on the cards any day soon!!...lol.

    Superb images of the Heron and the Gannetgull!...[;o)

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  3. Thanks Adrian. It was fascinating watching the gull.

    Cheers Trevor. Yea, bloody cold, but enjoyable. That gull was interesting to watch.

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  4. HI Keith...Sure sounds and looks pretty breezy!! Lovely sunrise though!!
    I enjoyed that wild dive of the gull? very nice!! : }
    The Heron and the Kingfisher shots are wonderful..especially like the Kingfisher !! : ]
    Hugs Grace

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  5. The diving gull was really only head butting the surface, so slow it seemed to be bouncing straight up again. Fun to watch.
    Lovely Sunrise. Cold blustery wind everywhere today. More to come tomorrow by the sounds of it.

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  6. The Diver is still there, well done in seeing that.

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  7. Thanks Grace. Yea, the wind had a real bight to it. Big coat weather already lol

    Thanks John. The gull did get pretty manic at times with his diving, but mostly fairly casual like you say.
    I think the snow will be here soon.

    Thank you Bob. It looks like the diver is going to stay awhile.

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  8. The diver is a lovely bird to see.
    Blowing a hoolie up here today I hope the wind dies down by the weekend...

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  9. Thanks Andrew. I hope he stays through the winter. Doesn't seem so windy here yet.

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