Personal musings, wanderings and sightings from around the lake.
A little history, and about the lake, at the bottom of the page.

quote

Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me



Thursday, 3 November 2011

Quiet on the Water

And not a Deep Purple song to be heard either.

A very quiet morning on the north lake; not many water birds around at all.
A few Herons, Swans and Wigeon, along with lots of Coots; and that was about it.

At the footbridge, plenty of Chaffinch taking the seed, and good to see some Reed Buntings again.



The highlight this morning though, was watching two Crows escorting a Sparrowhawk, high in the sky, away from the lake area. As all this was going on, a flock of Starlings were heading towards them. Suddenly a quick detour, as they back tracked away from possible trouble.
I doubt the Sparrowhawk could have done anything at the time though, he was more concerned by being mobbed by the unwelcome pair of Crows; but it was fascinating to watch the events unfold in the skies.

Quite a large group of Black-headed Gulls on the jetty, by the pub, along with the usual Lesser Black-backed Gull; and a few Starlings sitting on the sails of the pubs windmill.

Back at the feeders, it was interesting to see how much seed the birds had got through in just 90 minutes. Half a dozen Goldfinch and Greenfinch, all jockeying for position on the feeder.

Hopefully they'll find the new ones at the new area soon, before the squirrel takes it all.







Full list of today's sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Eurasian Sparrowhawk [sp] (Accipiter nisus)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Lesser Black-backed Gull [sp] (Larus fuscus)
Feral Pigeon (Columba livia 'feral')
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Green Woodpecker [sp] (Picus viridis)
British Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes indigenus)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos clarkei)
British Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus rosaceus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Eurasian Jackdaw [sp] (Corvus monedula)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  32

11 comments:

  1. What was that monster in the lake? Looked like a lobster.

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  2. Lovely image of the Reed Bunting Keith.
    It's nice to see the 'little birds' doing so well...[;o)

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  3. Not sure what that was Adrian. There were a few of them there.

    Cheers Trevor. Yea, they're certainly getting through the seed lol

    Thanks Bob :-)

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  4. Keith - Adrian, I think the monster in the lake is a Signal Crayfish... This is what Wikipedia says....
    The signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, is a North American species of crayfish. It was introduced to Europe in the 1960s to supplement the Scandinavian Astacus astacus fisheries, which were being damaged by crayfish plague, but the imports turned out to be a carrier of that disease. The signal crayfish is now an invasive species, ousting native species across Europe and Japan.

    Hope this helps...[;o)

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  5. Thanks Trevor. I've seen a few of these in the lake; sometimes just the orange claw. I wondered what they were.

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  6. A delicate chorus of birds to begin my day :) thank you Keith.
    Such a beautiful place you have to explore, I must sound like a broken record, but truly, you view nature like I and it so wonderful to share your journey from so far away.

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  7. Really nice shot of the Reed Bunting Keith.

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  8. Gemel, you are very welcome; and I'm glad you enjoy your visits round the lake.

    Thank you Roy. It's good to see them around the footbridge now.

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  9. Beautiful Chafinch shot--the birds in the video look happy and well fed--

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  10. Sondra, I think these must be the best fed birds in Milton Keynes lol

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