Personal musings, wanderings and sightings from around the lake.
A little history, and about the lake, at the bottom of the page.

quote

Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me



Sunday, 13 March 2011

Wet morning, but a good one.

It was dry to begin with, but very dull and cloudy. Rain looked imminent.

The Crows were first up at the bird table, and soon made short work of the digestive biscuits and bread. Most of it got buried; how or if they ever find it all again, amazes me.



On the footbridge, I counted a massive 20 Chaffinches, after I had put some seed down. A fantastic sight. A Song Thrush was singing from the trees as usual, and it took me a while to locate him, but I did eventually.

The piping sound of an Oystercatcher caught my attention too, and a brief glimpse as he headed over the trees, towards the north lake. I made my way under the road bridge, fed the Mallards who came over, watched some Coots fighting, then found the Oystercatcher. Not one, but two. Before I could make my way across the bridge, to get closer, a cyclist had them up in the air, and heading for the south lake. Maybe I’d catch up with them later.

The trees are bursting with buds and catkins now; spring is certainly making its presence felt. As I made my way round the north lake, a stunning male Siskin caught my eye, as he was drinking from the lake, amongst the reeds. A pair of Great Crested Grebes were performing the head waggle, and further along, a couple of Mute Swans were busily nest building.

A small group of Wigeon were grazing, just along from some very noisy Canada Geese, and a few boats were making their way through the water. Ah yes, the weekend!
At the top end of the lake, a female Goosander was swimming, with just a handful of Tufted Duck for company.

After admiring a group of Daffodils, I made my way round the south lake.
Reed Buntings arguing amongst the reeds; territory disputes I imagine, and plenty of Blue, Great and Long Tailed Tits, flying through the trees and bushes.
At the very bottom end of the lake, a Great Spotted Woodpecker flew up into the trees, but was not willing to pose for pictures. Shame.

More noisy Canada Geese, and a lone Pochard, and then I made my way back towards the car park. The rain had started in earnest now.
As I got level with the Cormorant island, I found the two Oystercatchers at the edge. I wonder if they’ll breed on the island?

Back at the footbridge the rain was still falling, but a quick scan through the binoculars, and I found a Brambling, on the ground, under the feeders, with a group of Chaffinch. The lake was getting busier now, as more people were out walking and jogging. I decided to head home.

An excellent morning though, despite the rain, and dull conditions.




I got carried away with the video, so there are 3 shorter ones.













Full list of today’s sightings

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Greylag Goose [sp] (Anser anser)
Greater Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Common Pochard (Aythya ferina)
Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
Goosander (Mergus merganser merganser)
Great Crested Grebe [sp] (Podiceps cristatus)
Great Cormorant [sp] (Phalacrocorax carbo)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Common Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Eurasian Oystercatcher [sp] (Haematopus ostralegus)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
British Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major anglicus)
Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba yarrellii)
British Dunnock (Prunella modularis occidentalis)
British Robin (Erithacus rubecula melophilus)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
British Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos clarkei)
Redwing [sp] (Turdus iliacus)
British Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus rosaceus)
British Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus obscurus)
British Great Tit (Parus major newtoni)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
House Sparrow [sp] (Passer domesticus)
British Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs gengleri)
Brambling (Fringilla montifringilla)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)
Eurasian Siskin (Carduelis spinus)
Reed Bunting [sp] (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Total species  35

9 comments:

  1. Nice crow portrait!

    Kah Wai
    http://kwbirding.blogspot.com/

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  2. I love winter, spring is good but I love desolation. Oyster Catchers are two a penny up here. Geese are fighting none stop. I think it's territory they are flying in the dark weird or what. They spend all winter mobbed up but then all hell breaks loose.
    A superb post that more than compensates for your absence

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  3. Super videos Keith, they show perfectly how wonderful nature is. :0)

    It would a great help for next time if we could please have subtitles in Goose. lol.

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  4. Kah Wai, thank you. The Crows have got used to me, and let me get quite close.

    Thanks Adrian. The geese certainly behave a bit odd at times, and very vocal.

    Thanks Trevor. Yea, I often wonder what they are saying lol

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  5. It was interesting to watch the swans building, something I have never seen.

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  6. Great videos Keith and a beautifully written post. There was a lot going on at the lake today!

    It was so lovely to see the Swans building their nest so busily. You will definitely have to keep an eye on them.

    I think I was as pleased as you when the Mallard turned up :)

    Those Daffodils were a real picture! I think your Primroses were actually Cowslips though ;)

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  7. Thanks John. They are so busy and never seem to tire in their efforts.

    Thanks Jan. Had a good visit there; first one for a week.
    You're right about the Cowslips. I couldn't think of the name, and Primrose just came in my head lol
    I'm going to have to dust down my plant, butterfly and dragon books, and do some revision on names, before spring gets too underway. :)

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  8. Ah, you can write about the birds as well taking extreme photos.

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  9. Thanks Bob. I should write a bit more often, but I get lazy lol

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